THROUGH MAY 15
29th Annual Artist Self-Portrait Exhibition at Glenn Eure’s Ghost Fleet Gallery

By on March 29, 2024

Pat Eure with self portrait done by Glenn Eure. (Photo by Mary Ellen Riddle)
"My Story" bronze sculpture by Jodi Hollnagle- Jubran. (Photo by Mary Ellen Riddle)
"Birds Are Verbs" By Linda Lauby, Acrylics, Powder Pigment, Pen and Pencil. (Photo by Sharon Whitehurst)
"Phoenix Rising" by Mary Ann P Remer, mixed media. (Photo by Mary Ellen Riddle)
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Pat Eure with self portrait done by Glenn Eure. <br>(Photo by Mary Ellen Riddle)
"My Story" bronze sculpture by Jodi Hollnagle- Jubran. (Photo by Mary Ellen Riddle)
"Birds Are Verbs" By Linda Lauby,  Acrylics, Powder Pigment, Pen and Pencil. (Photo by Sharon Whitehurst)
"Phoenix Rising" by Mary Ann P Remer, mixed media. (Photo by Mary Ellen Riddle)
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Visitors to the 29th Annual Artist Self-Portrait Exhibition will have the opportunity to travel into the minds of artists and see how they envision themselves through visual and literary works. The show is on display at Glenn Eure’s Ghost Fleet Gallery in Nags Head from April 1 through May 15 with the opening reception on April 1 from 1-3 p.m.

This year sees 51 visual entries and 8 literary entries. The artists were challenged to work under the theme: “My Self- Portrait: Being or Doing.”  One image shows an artist sitting in a chair with a backdrop of multiple filled-to-the-brim bookcases behind him. His title: “Surrounded by Friends.”

Others include a realistic self-portrait in oil and a seated female figure cast in bronze. The themes stretch wildly from a phoenix rising to a depiction of medical accouterments belonging to an artist who worked for 40 years as a nurse. The meaning of some works seems mysterious, while several artists dispelled the mystery by including a brief description of what the portrayals mean to them.

Mediums also include acrylic and watercolor paint, lithography, pastel, cloth, mixed media art, photography, stained glass, and wood.

The literary works were strong on reminiscing about youth—what formed them, frightened them, and even set them off to purposely “thinking” for the first time.

The brainchild of the late Glen Eure, the self-portrait show started with the mission to have fun according to his wife Pat Eure, who ran the gallery for many years with her husband and has continued to keep the lamp burning since his death in 2018.

She smiles as she looks back fondly on the evolution of the exhibition that has seen local, with regional, national and global artists participating.

“You know, when you’re an artist and you establish a reputation of doing a certain thing, it’s kind of freeing to just say we’re having a show and do a self-portrait any way you want to,” she said. “Just have fun doing it.”

For the first nine years, beginning in 1995, the Eures did not use themes. But in 2005, they introduced the idea to help inspire artists. Eure laughs while gazing at a list of themes. Think: create a self-portrait as a clown or in the buff. Others suggest you go mild or wild, step out of the mirror or shock the world of art. There was a work submitted in 2015 when the theme was “Something Only You Are Capable of Creating,” that really nailed the theme. The artist submitted a series of his fingerprints in sealing wax.

Glenn Eure, himself, was no stranger to the art of the self-portrait. As an East Carolina University art school graduate, he already had produced several. And he participated in the gallery’s self-portrait show annually. The former military man depicted himself in uniform, and under the theme “Any Way You Can Stretch It,” he painted a portrait resembling a distorted image that one might see in a fun house mirror.

Glenn Eure was in good company and entered the show with a number of longtime artist friends who have since passed away.  This included Bruce Frazier, who died last November. This year’s show is dedicated to him. He was a music educator, composer and a conductor as well as an artist. Pat Eure well remembers a self-portrait entry of his. “It was his image matted by the sheet music for one of his compositions,” she said.” But I think it was a beautiful depiction of a multi-discipline artist.”

Despite the loss of Eure and many other prominent artists, the show continues and is going strong. It has even included descendants of one longtime entrant. That makes Pat Eure happy.

Awards for literary and visual works will be announced at the reception.


Glenn Eure’s Ghost Fleet Gallery is located at 210 E. Driftwood St., Nags Head. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Friday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information call  (252-441-6584).



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